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Microsoft is developing a CMOS silicon chip-based quantum computer

Microsoft is developing a CMOS silicon chip-based quantum computer

Researchers at Microsoft and the University of Sydney in Australia are developing a quantum computer based on CMOS silicon chips.

The “complementary semiconductor metal oxide” or CMOS process is used to make many computer components, which is why researchers at Microsoft and the University of Sydney they want Use this familiar approach instead of other approaches such as trapping ions.

The idea for a silicon chip-based quantum computer was first mooted in 1998, but researchers have been making it a reality for more than two decades. One of the biggest challenges ahead is that CMOS chips typically generate so much heat that it can interfere with the operation of quantum bits, or qubits.

(Left) Simplified diagram of the thermal conductivity model of the Gooseberry chip (right) Gooseberry chip (red) along with the Qubit (blue) and chip (purple) test chips

To cool the qubits, they must be refrigerated at a temperature close to zero Kelvin, which is why the current quantum computers of companies like IBM and Honeywell have fewer qubits or less cooking power. To build a quantum computer with hundreds or thousands of qubits, the problem of heat must be solved, and now it seems that Microsoft has found a suitable solution.

Researchers at Microsoft and the University of Sydney recently published an article in the journal Nature Electronics detailing the development of a chip called Gooseberry that can support thousands of qubits. According to Microsoft, the chip is slightly lost while operating at 100 milliquelins and therefore does not go beyond the cooling capacity of current standard research refrigerators, eliminating the challenge of connecting thousands of wires to a previously unresolved refrigerator.

Researchers at Microsoft and the University of Australia have also designed a cryo-compute core that sits on top of a Gooseberry chip in a quantum stack to relay information from the quantum layer. This kernel is a processor or CPU suitable for general applications designed to operate at higher temperatures (2 K instead of 100 M).

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